KinderIQ

Try our interactive Kindergarten Skills Assessment
Rainy Day Activities For Kids

Rainy Day Activities For Kids

Back to all activities
Indoor Soccer
Thumbs Up
Thumbs Down

Yes, indoor soccer! Preschoolers don't often have the leg strength and coordination to kick a soccer ball very hard and loft it into the air. If your child can accomplish one of these actions you may want to rethink where this activity takes place. As you kick the soccer ball back and forth to each other, count the kicks. See how many times you can kick the ball to each other before one of you misses. It's a great counting game and gets you both up on your feet.


Slap a Card
Thumbs Up
Thumbs Down

This is a great game to play with nothing more than a deck of cards and two or more players. The parent should be the dealer and the children should be the players. The dealer names which color should be slapped, either red or black. As the dealer flips over cards from the deck, the players should attempt to be the first to slap any cards of the named color. The first to slap the card gets to keep the card. If a player slaps a card that is the wrong color that player loses all of his or her cards. When the dealer finishes the deck the players should count their cards. The player with the most cards wins.

For players that are a bit beyond acknowledging colors, modify this game to odd or even numbers or multiples of a chosen number.


Tour the House
Thumbs Up
Thumbs Down

Tell your child that it's time to take a tour of the house on a hunting adventure. Play this up by putting on special hats and dressing for the occasion. Draw on a piece of paper a specific shape. Tell your child the name of the shape and explain that the two of you are hunting for items in the house that are the same shape. As you walk from room to room speak with a tone of surprise as you each find the shape.

This may also be modified by finding a particular color or texture. For instance, the two of you can hunt down all of the soft items in your home such as blankets, pillows, towels and stuffed toys.


Have something better?  Let us know!

Activity Name
Description
Contributor
KinderIQ is a Homeschool.com Top 100 Educational Website

Kindergarten Testing Explained
There was a time not that long ago that when a child turned a certain age, they simply went to kindergarten, whether they had any pre-school behind them or not.  Now you may find that they need to take a kindergarten test.  (continue reading)
Kindergarten Testing

Three Early Childhood Writing Activities
Many children begin writing or "play writing" well before they can read even the simplest words.  Here are three early childhood writing activities you can use to guide your child's writing enthusiasm and help develop their creative talents.  (continue reading)
Kindergarten Writing Skills

The Most Important Factor For School Readiness
According to Northwestern University researcher Greg Duncan, "We find the single most important factor in predicting later academic achievement is that children begin school with a mastery of early math and literacy concepts."  (continue reading)
Math in Kindergarten

Assessing Early Literacy Skills
Think your child may be ready to start reading?  A child with a head start on reading and literacy has a greater chance of success in the first years of school and is more likely to finish college compared to children who begin to read at a later age.  (continue reading)
Early Literacy Assessment

Expanding Vocabulary with Rhyming Games
Rhyming is one of the first skills that children can practice to start understanding letter-sound-word relationships and can be a fun way to expand early vocabulary by building on familiar word patterns that children are already comfortable with.  (continue reading)
Rhyming Words

Reading To Your Child - 10 Reasons To Do It
Few dispute the benefits of reading aloud to young children, and there are many reasons that reading to children is important.  Here are 10 of the best reasons to make a habit of cracking open a book with your child on a daily basis.  (continue reading)
Reading To Children