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Does anyone have Kindergarten screening test experience?

What is the testing like? What should we work on?
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  March 14, 2016 by Anonymous
For most children, Kindergarten is the next logical step after preschool, but not everyone learns at the same rate. For this reason, many Kindergarten programs suggest or require readiness tests to ensure your child is prepared for a classroom setting. These tests are not necessarily academic in nature, but rather test the skills necessary for children to excel in a Kindergarten curriculum. Different school districts offer different tests, but the general content is the same across the country.

Language Skills
In language skills tests, children are evaluated based on their speech patterns, whether they speak in full sentences, and whether adults can understand them. Some tests may also examine a child's ability to follow simple directions, like putting on a coat or fetching an item.

Self-Care Skills
Self-care skills evaluate a child's ability to take care of himself, doing things like blowing his nose, tying his shoes, and fastening his own pants. These skills indicate an independence necessary in a classroom without a parent present.

Motor Skills
By age 4 to 5, most children have a limited range of fine and gross motor skills, including kicking a ball, running, hopping, holding a pencil, and drawing a line. Children who struggle with these basic movements may have trouble keeping up with class expectations.

Cognitive Skills
Cognitive skills tests quiz students on knowledge and mental functions. These tests will general ask children to tackle simple problems, like naming colors, counting to five, reciting portions of the alphabet, and putting together small puzzles.

Few children are masters in all areas, and most children will have unique strengths and weaknesses based on personality and prior experience. In general, these tests are designed to evaluate a child's development and readiness for life in a classroom environment. Children who excel in some or most of these areas, or are able to successfully complete several tasks from each category, are likely ready for the best Kindergarten experience.
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  August 21, 2016 by Anonymous
Each state is different for kindergarten, how do I know which one is right, and I want to practice things he needs work on not things he already knows.

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